Tag Archives: animals

Food for Thought // Caley Falcocchia

“There are these two young fish swimming along, and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says, “Morning, boys, how’s the water?” And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes, ‘What the hell is water?’”

-David Foster Wallace, “This is Water”

When I walked into my English Critical Thinking and Writing (CTW) class on the first day, I had no idea what to expect.  My professor, Nick Leither, showed the class David Foster Wallace’s commencement speech “This is Water.”  After discussing the speech, Professor Nick switched gears and flicked the screen over to the next slide.  The screen displayed the course overview, reading “Food Porn: Reading Food, Self, & Culture.”  Both intrigued and confused, I left class on that first day with two questions.  First off, how can an english class be entirely dedicated to food?  Also, what the hell is water?  I had no clue what was to come during the two quarters of this class.  

I should first explain that I did not sign up for this class.  Every freshman at Santa Clara University (SCU) is randomly placed into a mandatory CTW class before even arriving to campus.  I was honestly quite displeased when I learned that I had been assigned a 7:30-9:10 PM CTW class.  Convinced that my brain would not be capable of attending class at this time of the day, my naive-self even talked to my advisor to see if I could switch into a different CTW section at a different time.  As you can probably guess, my advisor told me to suck it up, and viola- my “Food Porn” CTW class at 7:30-9:10 PM was here to stay for two quarters.  Although I was first unhappy by my CTW course placement, the class and its material caused me to reflect on my lifestyle and personal values, which which will continue to stick with me- not only for the remainder of my college experience- but for the rest of my life.  

Continue reading Food for Thought // Caley Falcocchia

The Fast and The Delicious?// Andres Jimenez

My mother’s cooking was never to amazing when I was a child, the same dishes week after week began to haunt my evening dinners. So when we had a chance to get fast food it was always the best. “What do you guys want to eat?”, were the best words my parents would say after an exhausting day. McDonald’s, Taco Bell, Burger King all so delicious and fun, but which one shall we choose? It became harder than a judges role in the pursuit of justice to decide what we wanted. Not only thinking about the food, but the new toys and the huge playgrounds. But in the end no matter what we got or ate it was always a let down after the meal. From tired bodies to hurt stomachs there was always something that made us regret why we even wanted it in the first place. What is it that is bringing us back to these fast food restaurants? Continue reading The Fast and The Delicious?// Andres Jimenez

Can’t Keep My Thoughts to Myself // Emma Carpenter

I was uncomfortable from the minute I walked into “Critical Thinking and Writing” at 5:25pm on a Monday–the first day of my college career. I was uncomfortable being in a new state, surrounded by new people who had new interests and perceptions of what was “in” and what wasn’t. I grew even more uncomfortable when my teacher was late and one of my classmates insisted we all get in a circle and chat. That was not me. I was also very intimidated by the idea of critically thinking and thinking for myself. I had become very good at keeping quiet and reading the classroom and then reiterating exactly what I knew the teacher wanted to hear on whatever assessment came up. In fact, if I was directly asked my thoughts on something I would mutter an “I don’t know” and quickly divert my attention. Critical Thinking and Writing? This was not my cup of tea, to say the least.

Continue reading Can’t Keep My Thoughts to Myself // Emma Carpenter

A-What?-Ness // Ana Maria Vidaurri

I’ll always remember my brother telling me “ignorance of a law is not an excuse to break the law.” This seemed really strange to me, as I wondered how everyone could possibly know every law in every city in every part of the world. I’ve come to realize that what my brother said to me those many years ago is true, not just in judicial hearings, but in everyday life.

So often people choose to do what is easiest for them. They choose to drive a car because it is easier than walking home. They choose to go to McDonalds because it is easier than picking up groceries at the supermarket and cooking a meal. And more often than not, they choose to ignore underlying problems when dealing with intense issues, such as animal cruelty, sustainability, and violence. However, it is crucial for one to educate themselves on important issues in order to gain greater understanding of a situation and generate a clear opinion.  Continue reading A-What?-Ness // Ana Maria Vidaurri

I Slept With My Professor // Sean Driscoll

It’s true. I slept with my professor. My relationship with Nicholas Leither began on September 15th, 2015. I had just moved into my dorm early, four days before move-in day, with my roommate Gary Schlatter to prepare for a camping trip. The camping trip was through a school-sponsored program called, “Into the Wild,” which takes Santa Clara University students on outdoor activities ranging from surfing and skiing, to hiking and camping.

Continue reading I Slept With My Professor // Sean Driscoll

A Routine of Blindness // Jack Chapman

Over the course of six months, I never expected my perspective could change so drastically. After reading many influential texts, watching many depictive films, and having a number of important conversations with my colleagues, I’ve come to a realization;

Continue reading A Routine of Blindness // Jack Chapman

What is the Message?: It’s Not Very Obvious // Connor Redmond

In what way can I possibly sum up this year? The topics we have covered have varied in extreme levels and seem to have nothing in common. How could I possibly compare the Columbine massacre to “The Walking Dead”, a tv series based on the zombie apocalypse? What similarities are there between the serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer and the “mass production”, if you will, of animals that makes up factory farming? And don’t get me started on the seemingly nonexistent connection between the video “This is Water” and the issues of sustainability. When we initially think about it, the obvious answer to these questions is that there are no real connections. Continue reading What is the Message?: It’s Not Very Obvious // Connor Redmond