Tag Archives: Eating Animals

Food for Thought // Caley Falcocchia

“There are these two young fish swimming along, and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says, “Morning, boys, how’s the water?” And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes, ‘What the hell is water?’”

-David Foster Wallace, “This is Water”

When I walked into my English Critical Thinking and Writing (CTW) class on the first day, I had no idea what to expect.  My professor, Nick Leither, showed the class David Foster Wallace’s commencement speech “This is Water.”  After discussing the speech, Professor Nick switched gears and flicked the screen over to the next slide.  The screen displayed the course overview, reading “Food Porn: Reading Food, Self, & Culture.”  Both intrigued and confused, I left class on that first day with two questions.  First off, how can an english class be entirely dedicated to food?  Also, what the hell is water?  I had no clue what was to come during the two quarters of this class.  

I should first explain that I did not sign up for this class.  Every freshman at Santa Clara University (SCU) is randomly placed into a mandatory CTW class before even arriving to campus.  I was honestly quite displeased when I learned that I had been assigned a 7:30-9:10 PM CTW class.  Convinced that my brain would not be capable of attending class at this time of the day, my naive-self even talked to my advisor to see if I could switch into a different CTW section at a different time.  As you can probably guess, my advisor told me to suck it up, and viola- my “Food Porn” CTW class at 7:30-9:10 PM was here to stay for two quarters.  Although I was first unhappy by my CTW course placement, the class and its material caused me to reflect on my lifestyle and personal values, which which will continue to stick with me- not only for the remainder of my college experience- but for the rest of my life.  

Continue reading Food for Thought // Caley Falcocchia

Either You are a Hypocrite or Not//Ryan Werner

What if I told you that you could win the hit television game show “Jeopardy”? You have the body of knowledge required to win Jeopardy if you are able to answer the following question: What is the complete definition of the word amphisbaena? If you are anything like me, you have absolutely no clue of what the definition entails. Unfortunately for me, this is demonstrative of the harsh reality of my inability to become a Jeopardy wizard. However, I do have a solution for my lack of knowledge regarding Jeopardy esque questions through a handy-dandy gadget called an iPhone. Principally, the iPhone is a computer stuck in a phone’s body which has the capability to “Google” any question from essentially anywhere. The modern technological age has paved the way to an ever growing level of accessibility and magnitude of data at the few taps of a finger.

The era of such readily available information has revolutionized research and provided countless benefits to billions of people across the globe. The age of information has shed light on topics which historically “the average joe” would not be informed about. However, such convenient access to mass data is also symbolic of a troubling truth within our society. For instance, despite awareness and access to information regarding issues such as food health, consumers continue to devour products that are detrimental to their health. Furthermore, despite taking a course at Santa Clara University outlying the dangers and atrocities of factory farming and processed foods, I directly witnessed classmates continue to consume such commodities directly before and after class. These were the same students who wrote papers, presented projects, and on a daily basis discussed the dangerous and atrophic nature of factory farmed meat. Continually, the same students who discussed the subsequent in-class reading from Princeton graduate and published author Jonathon Foer,

“Of course, consumers might notice that their chickens don’t taste quite right – how good could a drug-stuffed, disease-ridden, shit-contaminated animal possibly taste? – but the birds will be injected (or otherwise pumped up) with ‘broth’ and salty solutions to give them what we have come to think of as the chicken look, smell, and taste” (Foer).

Despite the preceding knowledge, I even found myself making acceptations on ingesting the very same products—such as chicken— that I disregarded in class. Bringing forth the question: does information and knowledge result in a change of behavior?

Despite cultural awareness and direct access to health risks of the food we consume, Americans constantly stand number one in the world in average obesity (Khan-US Health News). This is further reflective of the notion that information and knowledge are not substantial in altering behavior to create positive change in food consumption and thus our environment. The technological age has not only made finding information faster but has also aided in the development of a culture and generation of consumers who fail to consider long run impacts, morals, and that require a (legitimate) direct threat to generate considerable self change.

Conversely, many point to information as the key in igniting change. After all, if someone is unaware of steroids used in meat production, then how will they know the dangers of such food and initiate change in their eating behavior? In fact, the majority of students in my environmentally-based English class had no idea that for every one pound of beef produced roughly 1800 gallons of water is expended (Food Tank). Without knowing the extreme environmental impacts of consuming beef, no students in the class would change their behavior in regards to their diet and beef consumption. Hence, no change can be generated without awareness and knowledge. Former Secretary-General of the United Nations Kofi Annan discussed the influence of knowledge in reference to world poverty while addressing the UN, “Knowledge is power. Information is liberating. Education is the premise of progress, in every society and in every family” (Annan).  Kofi Annan, although not discussing the environment, was implying that with

out world awareness of global poverty and without access to education that mass poverty would never end. Similar to Annan’s point about poverty, a lack of environmental awareness and education across the globe has allowed for environmental ignorance. Environmental ignorance is evident in American as 51 percent of adults believe that climate change is not caused by human activity (Funk-Pew Center of Research). If half of American adults do not even believe in climate change, how will progress in regards to more specific, yet imperative, threats to the environment such as food production and consumption be solved? Thus demonstrating that without an expanded education and awareness of environmental issues that beneficial progress in the environment is improbable. The ignorance and unawareness of human impact on the environment is why countless novelists, filmmakers, and professors are working to create awareness regarding environmental topics. Without watching, reading, and discussing such works in my environmentally-based English class at Santa Clara University, I would have never known the countless impacts that I directly have on the environment; nor would I know to alter my behavior.

Talk is Cheap

Despite health advisory labels and a modern comprehension of the severe impacts of smoking, why do smokers keep smoking cigarettes? Yes, most smokers are extremely addicted to substances in cigarettes such as nicotine. However, smokers also fail to see the long run impacts of their action. Chances are, in the short run, no momentous impact will affect smokers well-being; it’s not like smokers who smoke cigarettes will drop dead in a week. Similar to the disconnect someone has between smoking a cigarette and the potential of getting cancer years down the road; there remains a disconnect between the knowledge of an individual and their behavior regarding their environmental impact. There is no denying that environmental ignorance and unawareness are serious problems in their own right. Nevertheless, having environmental awareness of the consequences of one’s actions does not solve behavior nor significantly benefit the environment. Witnessing my classmates continue to consume factory farmed chicken is symbolic that understanding how bad something is cannot override behavior, especially when competing with convenience and immediate gratification. Foer eloquently conveys this notion through the metaphor, “While it is always possible to wake a person who’s sleeping, no amount of noise will wake a person who is pretending to be asleep” (Foer). It is quite easy to pretend to care versus the effort it takes to genuinely care, let alone turn care into action and behavioral change.

Seeing is Believing and Understanding

In general, it is much simpler to discuss and debate the morals of hunting versus buying a salami sandwich. Why? Because hunting is directly correlated to killing, while buying a salami sandwich involves disconnect from the reality that you are eating an animal. I grew up hunting wild game alongside my dad who constantly reminded me, “It’s easy to pull the trigger but it’s the work that comes after that’s not easy”. As a hunter who has killed several large mammals—such as deer and wild boar—it still pains me in an indescribable way to take something’s life. Conversely, it never was hard for me to buy a sandwich from the store. Nonetheless, overtime I began to understand what my dad meant from his advice. The handling of the animal once it was killed was by far the hardest part of the hunt; vastly harder than trekking across miles of mountainous terrain packed to the gill with gear. I often found myself gagging and nearly spilling my stomachs contents as I skinned, gutted, and dressed the animals. I literally had to pull every organ, still covered in still warm blood, from the animals. Despite the goriness, I gained an appreciation and further understanding of meat. The way that I perceive meat and the animals from where meat comes will never be the same. I was only able to gain a new perspective of meat by partaking in the immediate (direct) impacts from my actions of killing and processing the meat.

This discovery connects back to the reason why people are incapable of generating change in their behavior from knowledge. Before I ever fired an arrow or bullet, it was effortless to discuss what hunting entailed. It was only after having to physically touch and after finding a direct connection to meat that I was able to fully comprehend that meat is from a conscious life form. All the while, keeping in mind that factory farming treats animals more so like a crop of corn than that of a living creature (Foer). The disconnect between one’s actions and the results that follow are quite evident: whether it is eating beef, smoking a cigarette, or driving a car. Through this disconnect, a gap persists between one’s choices correlating to long run impacts, actions in relation to morality, and more so reflective of how someone’s behavior is resistant to change without direct self impact. This is a gap which simply cannot be bridged by awareness and knowledge.

No Simple Solution or Conclusion

Like countless college students, procrastination persists as a dilemma that I constantly have to battle. Versus studying, it is not hard to give way to the devil who remains eternally perched atop your conscious telling you to stay in bed or watch Netflix. In such moments, I am fully aware of what procrastination entails but more times than not I end up caving to the habit. Despite having an awareness of procrastination, I still tend to think in the short run and end up only hurting myself exponentially by procrastinating. It is substantially more demanding to constantly hold ourselves accountable. Nevertheless, self-accountability remains vital to maintain our ability to produce at the highest level and be the best that we can be in all aspects of life. The same goes for the environment, we either know or have the capability to know the consequences of our actions. Ultimately, signifying that collectively we can alter our behaviors now or continue to procrastinate as the environment gets worse and worse.

The only way to benefit the greater environment is by holding your choices accountable as an individual; such as not eating beef or biking instead of driving. God will not fix our environment, the government will not fix our environment, and privatized industry most certainly will not help the environment. The only person who can make a difference right now is you. The mindset of acting upon knowledge must become as celebrated and ingrained in American culture as obtaining an education. You may believe that it is impossible to make a difference alone, a mentality often seen in voting where many feel that their vote does not count in the grand scheme of things. This deceptive mentality is reflected in the most recent presidential election through the summation of citizens who thought their vote wouldn’t count and choose not to partake. It is commonly known, all politics aside, that the vast majority of Americans from all political denominations believed Donald Trump would never win the race. Nonetheless, you have failed in being self-accountable—in the same light as choosing to not vote—by not individually acting upon environmental awareness. Due to the long-term nature of the environment, most likely you will never witness big picture or noteworthy results from either progress or setbacks correlating to the environment. Despite the selfish nature of human consciousness take a look at your children, grandchildren, younger siblings, and more so the next generation as they are who will reap what you sow.

“Perhaps in the back of our minds we already understand, without all the science I’ve discussed, that something terribly wrong is happening. Our sustenance now comes from misery. We know that if someone offers to show us a film on how our meat is produced, it will be a horror film. We perhaps know more than we care to admit, keeping it down in the dark places of our memory– disavowed” (Foer).

Like other novelists, I could write a book on the science of our behavior or the environmental impacts of each one of our actions such as consuming beef. This has already been done and that is not the goal of my essay. I am not going to list the ways you can make a difference, as there is no one magical solution or vaccine. There is an immeasurable amount of data on the environment and how we contribute negatively out there for you to find. Google it. It is your moral obligation to hold yourself accountable and act upon what you find and what you already know.

The one thing that unites the whole world is our world. The issues facing the environment and our role within it unites everyone no matter of political support, skin color, origin, sex, wealth, or age. Even if you a dinosaur, who does not believe in climate change, you are still not excused from your choices pertaining to the environment as there remains other directly correlated choices you can control such as through your role in supporting mass meat production. Anyone can talk all they want or soak up all the knowledge in the world but ultimately it comes down to action. If you so choose, keep ignoring the consequences of your actions and sleep good at night knowing that you are a hypocrite. There is no doubt that today is a complicated time; yet thanks to the age of information, holding yourself self accountable to what you know or have the capability to know is very black and white: either you are a hypocrite or you are not.

Looking back the opening narrative and to the Jeopardy esque question, the definition of amphisbaena is a serpent from mythology with a head on each end of its body that can either move forward or backward (Dictonary.com). For the sake of the future, having no in-between, which direction will you choose?

 

 

Source Citations:

Annan, Kofi. “UN Press Release.” United Nations: Meeting Coverage and Press Release. United Nations, 23 June 1997. Web. 13 June 2017. <http://www.un.org/press/en/1997/19970623.sgsm6268.html&gt;.

“Amphisbaena Definition.” Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com. Web. 13 June 2017. <http://www.dictionary.com/browse/amphisbaena?s=t&gt;.

Foer, Jonathan Safran. Eating Animals. New York: Little, Brown, 2010. Print.

“Food Tank: Meat’s Large Water Footprint: Why Raising Livestock and Poultry for Meat Is so Resource Intensive.” Food Tank.27 Nov. 2016. Web. 13 June 2017. <https://foodtank.com/news/2013/12/why-meat-eats-resources/&gt;.

Funk, Cary, and Brian Kennedy. “Public Views on Climate Change and Climate Scientists.”Pew Research Center: Internet, Science & Tech. Pew Research Center, 04 Oct. 2016. Web. 13 June 2017. <http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/10/04/public-views-on-climate-change-and-climate-scientists/&gt;.

Khan, Amir. “America Tops List of 10 Most Obese Countries.” US News Health. US News and World Report, 28 May 2014. Web. 13 June 2017. <http://health.usnews.com/health-news/health-wellness/articles/2014/05/28/america-tops-list-of-10-most-obese-countries&gt;.

Image Citations:

Not Me Blaming Sign. Digital image. Time to Play. Time to Play Foundation,Web. 13 June 2017.

Funk, Cary, and Brian Kennedy. “Public Views on Climate Change and Climate Scientists.”Pew Research Center: Internet, Science & Tech. Pew Research Center, 04 Oct. 2016. Web. 13 June 2017. <http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/10/04/public-views-on-climate-change-and-climate-scientists/&gt;. (Public View on Climate Change Graph)

 

Lets Argue About It // Lauren Kemble

So let me get one thing straight, I need to add more opposition to my paper?? I thought the point was to strengthen my argument, not add more opposition to debunk it. Well it turns out I was wrong as my professor asked the class to help him write the structure of an essay up on the white board. Hook, thesis, explanation. Okay, I’ve got those down, but why is there a separate section for opposition? And what is he writing underneath opposition, support for it?

giphy

Before this class I thought the only opposition was at the beginning of the thesis sentence. You know the classic, “Although ___ (opposition goes here) ___, thesis statement” formula. Slowly I began to realize its more than just a sentence. Through making the detailed outlines for my essay this year, I was able to think through the opposition by supporting it with research. I learned that the stronger the opposition, the stronger the argument.   Continue reading Lets Argue About It // Lauren Kemble

“So,” He Asks Us // Allie Hogan

A man walks into a dingy classroom filled with yellow and green chairs, a brown satchel hanging across his chest.  He smiles at the students, who have been comfortably chatting with each other about school and life, before putting his bag down and switching on his computer to do attendance.  The man checks the room one more time, making sure he didn’t miss anyone, before saying, “okay”.  The students quiet down, and the professor takes a seat in a chair, closing the circle that the class sits in to discuss.  He clasps his hands together and leans over the desk.  “So,” he asks, “What do we think?”.

Walking into my critical thinking and writing class, I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect, I mean, the class is called Food Porn for crying out loud – what even is that?  I probably thought the class was going to be about gourmet food, or something dumb like that.  I was so focused on this name, Food Porn, that I didn’t think about the class title itself, critical thinking and writing.   Continue reading “So,” He Asks Us // Allie Hogan

Highway to the D̶a̶n̶g̶e̶r̶ Comfort Zone // Emily Wu

Just before I started college this past September, I discovered that embarking on a new milestone mostly meant receiving a flurry of unsolicited advice. From my sleeping schedule (a healthy mix between “you can sleep when you’re dead” and “if you don’t sleep eight hours, you’re gonna regret it”) to my yet-to-be-determined extracurriculars (but God forbid I don’t join any! That was [person A]’s biggest regret — not getting more involved. Plus, [person A] knows a [person B] who [did/didn’t] join a [fraternity/club/sport], and they [loved/regretted] it!), everybody had an opinion on everything.

Continue reading Highway to the D̶a̶n̶g̶e̶r̶ Comfort Zone // Emily Wu

Wake Up and Smell the Roses (Even If There are Some Thorns)//Aria Berluti

6a00d83455b8de69e200e553b1eab38834-800wi

The summer before coming to Santa Clara University, the school had sent an email to all the freshmen asking us to fill out a questionnaire describing our interests so that they could figure out which critical thinking and writing classes to place us in. The questionnaire read: “are you interested in philosophy? Economics? Science? The environment?” And the list went on. To be honest, when filling it out, I had no idea what I was interested in, so my answers were pretty random. So when I walked into my CTW 1 class on my first day of freshman year, I didn’t know what to expect. All I knew was that the title of the course was “Food Porn,” which I had just discovered an hour before class by checking Camino. Once I arrived, there sat the professor with two books in hand: Slant (written by the professor himself) and Eating Animals, a book about vegetarianism and the meat industry. Oh great, I thought. I should’ve paid more attention to my responses on that questionnaire. Here I was, a meat-eating student from San Francisco who had been listening to the endless arguments for vegetarianism for years and still had no intention of giving up meat. Not only is this professor going to try to convert us all into vegetarians, but he’s also going to try to make us follow the same writing format so that our papers all look the same? Ugh, welcome to freshman English. Needless to say, I left that first day feeling a little salty about this class and wondering what the hell I had gotten myself into. Continue reading Wake Up and Smell the Roses (Even If There are Some Thorns)//Aria Berluti

FOR THE LOVE OF COWS: Thinking More and Caring More // Annie Styles

“If we start thinking about farm animals as sentient creatures, we may have to change the way we live.” – Tracey Stewart, Do Unto Animals (141).

Are you willing to do that?

 


Animals bring indescribable joy and meaning to my life. Everyone knows how important they are to me. I want to go to veterinary school and work with animals, because I want to dedicate part of my life to animal welfare. I love all animals, but I am partial to a few species, including cattle. I love cattle. They are beautiful, breathtaking and downright cool — they have the ability to digest cellulose. Humans cannot do that. That is cool. During my second semester of my senior year of high school, I embarked upon an independent study in which I learned about the cow’s digestive system, particularly how the microbiome of bacteria in the stomach allowed the animal to digest cellulose. The study ended with giving a presentation at my school, open to anyone, explaining the design of the ruminant stomach, the microbes living there, and how grass diets and corn diets affect the stomach. Continue reading FOR THE LOVE OF COWS: Thinking More and Caring More // Annie Styles