Tag Archives: eating

Eating Without Question

I never was really interested in the food that I ate, especially since I wasn’t too picky and ate whatever my mom fed me. All that changed once I entered college and enrolled in a Critical Reading and Writing class.

I first thought, “Great, another English class where I learn pointless rules of how to structure my essays and reading boring essays.” However, this Critical Reading and Writing class completely surpassed my expectations. For the first quarter, we focused entirely upon the topic of “Food” reading books such as Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer. This completely changed my perspective upon food that I was putting in my body.

Image result for food cartoon

An essay I wrote, “Fever for Health” delved into the eating habits of college students. Having always heard about the so-called “obesity epidemic”, it all seemed far-fetched to me, especially seeing the lack of “obese” students. However, it was eye-opening upon learning that 95% of college students eat below the daily recommended amount of fruits and vegetables (Spain). Furthermore, although a “mere” 4.9% of college students were obese, 21.6% of them were deemed overweight (Huang). I was shocked. Although it wasn’t visible seeing this, I realized the food we consume has much more of an impact then we believe.

Image result for obesity cartoon

Not only do the food we consume affect our bodies internally and externally, there are consequences affecting beyond us. From Foer, I discovered the tragedy of the meat industry, with terrible conditions and treatment of animals that are bred solely for our consumption (Foer).

Image result for people looking at food

Now, this caused me to look internally within myself. I had always eaten food that was served for me without much thought besides, “It’s soccer season, so I should lay off of eating junk food.” Never I had given much thought like, “Where is this meat I’m eating come from and how was it produced?” Now, although I haven’t been converted to veganism or vegetarianism, I know think much critically on the food and its quality. This Critical Reading and Writing class actually turned out to truly educate me as I should’ve been previously.

 

 

Works Cited

Foer, Jonathan Safran. Eating Animals. Little, Brown & Company, 2013.

Huang, Terry T.K., et al. “Assessing Overweight, Obesity, Diet, and Physical Activity in College Students.” Taylor & Francis Online, Journal of American College Health, 24 Mar. 2010, www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07448480309595728.

Spain, Erin. “Northwestern Now.” College Kids Need to Change Unhealthy Ways, news.northwestern.edu/stories/2014/05/college-kids-need-to-change-unhealthy-ways.

 

 

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Food for Thought // Caley Falcocchia

“There are these two young fish swimming along, and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says, “Morning, boys, how’s the water?” And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes, ‘What the hell is water?’”

-David Foster Wallace, “This is Water”

When I walked into my English Critical Thinking and Writing (CTW) class on the first day, I had no idea what to expect.  My professor, Nick Leither, showed the class David Foster Wallace’s commencement speech “This is Water.”  After discussing the speech, Professor Nick switched gears and flicked the screen over to the next slide.  The screen displayed the course overview, reading “Food Porn: Reading Food, Self, & Culture.”  Both intrigued and confused, I left class on that first day with two questions.  First off, how can an english class be entirely dedicated to food?  Also, what the hell is water?  I had no clue what was to come during the two quarters of this class.  

I should first explain that I did not sign up for this class.  Every freshman at Santa Clara University (SCU) is randomly placed into a mandatory CTW class before even arriving to campus.  I was honestly quite displeased when I learned that I had been assigned a 7:30-9:10 PM CTW class.  Convinced that my brain would not be capable of attending class at this time of the day, my naive-self even talked to my advisor to see if I could switch into a different CTW section at a different time.  As you can probably guess, my advisor told me to suck it up, and viola- my “Food Porn” CTW class at 7:30-9:10 PM was here to stay for two quarters.  Although I was first unhappy by my CTW course placement, the class and its material caused me to reflect on my lifestyle and personal values, which which will continue to stick with me- not only for the remainder of my college experience- but for the rest of my life.  

Continue reading Food for Thought // Caley Falcocchia

Wake Up and Smell the Bacon: The Nightmare of Pig Slaughter and You the Serial Killer

Authors: Claire Calfo, Chelsea Conroy, Jacob Crown, Shima Dadashzadeh, Zoe Dulchinos, Michele Garlit, Isabella Giannini, Grant Gordon, Katie Hagan, Maxime Heerinckx, Katherine Jack, Madeline Kileen, Grace Mcdougal, John Nunziati, Charles Odei, Jonathon Redmond, Spencer Sins, Samuel Wheeler
Authors: Claire Calfo, Chelsea Conroy, Jacob Crown, Shima Dadashzadeh, Zoe Dulchinos, Michele Garlit, Isabella Giannini, Grant Gordon, Katie Hagan, Maxime Heerinckx, Katherine Jack, Madeline Kileen, Grace Mcdougal, John Nunziati, Charles Odei, Jonathon Redmond, Spencer Sins, Samuel Wheeler

Many of us students at Santa Clara University know at least one individual who loves to go on roller coasters, has been skydiving, or is always driving far above the speed limit. We call this individual an “adrenaline junky.” Just as the roller coaster gives a feeling of euphoria to the adrenaline junky, a murder often delivers the same feeling to the mind of a serial killer.

Continue reading Wake Up and Smell the Bacon: The Nightmare of Pig Slaughter and You the Serial Killer

Scratch // Gabby Jones

It’s safe to say that in the past few months as a freshman at Santa Clara University, I have learned a lot about myself. “A lot”, is actually an understatement. I am originally from Chicago, and up until last September I had never been away from home completely on my own. Sure, I had gone to three years of camp in the woods of Wisconsin as a kid and flown alone to visit my uncle in New York- but they all shared one thing in common, a crutch. The crutch being I had a safety net: my friends, family, and home. However, I wiped away the safety net that had been forming for the past few years and came by myself out to sunny Santa Clara, California. I started from scratch. Continue reading Scratch // Gabby Jones