Tag Archives: food industry

Food for Thought // Caley Falcocchia

“There are these two young fish swimming along, and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says, “Morning, boys, how’s the water?” And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes, ‘What the hell is water?’”

-David Foster Wallace, “This is Water”

When I walked into my English Critical Thinking and Writing (CTW) class on the first day, I had no idea what to expect.  My professor, Nick Leither, showed the class David Foster Wallace’s commencement speech “This is Water.”  After discussing the speech, Professor Nick switched gears and flicked the screen over to the next slide.  The screen displayed the course overview, reading “Food Porn: Reading Food, Self, & Culture.”  Both intrigued and confused, I left class on that first day with two questions.  First off, how can an english class be entirely dedicated to food?  Also, what the hell is water?  I had no clue what was to come during the two quarters of this class.  

I should first explain that I did not sign up for this class.  Every freshman at Santa Clara University (SCU) is randomly placed into a mandatory CTW class before even arriving to campus.  I was honestly quite displeased when I learned that I had been assigned a 7:30-9:10 PM CTW class.  Convinced that my brain would not be capable of attending class at this time of the day, my naive-self even talked to my advisor to see if I could switch into a different CTW section at a different time.  As you can probably guess, my advisor told me to suck it up, and viola- my “Food Porn” CTW class at 7:30-9:10 PM was here to stay for two quarters.  Although I was first unhappy by my CTW course placement, the class and its material caused me to reflect on my lifestyle and personal values, which which will continue to stick with me- not only for the remainder of my college experience- but for the rest of my life.  

Continue reading Food for Thought // Caley Falcocchia

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Discovering Fire // Olivia DeGraca

 

You are a caveman.  For years, you have traveled around, eating plants, living your life the way you know how, the way you learned by watching others. You have never thought to question it or change the way you live. You take what knowledge you are given and do not search for anything outside of that. Until one day. While attempting to entertain yourself by hitting two sticks together and making them echo in your cave as you usually do, you decide to rub the sticks together instead. It makes a different noise, one you’ve never heard before. Woah. Continue reading Discovering Fire // Olivia DeGraca

Can’t Keep My Thoughts to Myself // Emma Carpenter

I was uncomfortable from the minute I walked into “Critical Thinking and Writing” at 5:25pm on a Monday–the first day of my college career. I was uncomfortable being in a new state, surrounded by new people who had new interests and perceptions of what was “in” and what wasn’t. I grew even more uncomfortable when my teacher was late and one of my classmates insisted we all get in a circle and chat. That was not me. I was also very intimidated by the idea of critically thinking and thinking for myself. I had become very good at keeping quiet and reading the classroom and then reiterating exactly what I knew the teacher wanted to hear on whatever assessment came up. In fact, if I was directly asked my thoughts on something I would mutter an “I don’t know” and quickly divert my attention. Critical Thinking and Writing? This was not my cup of tea, to say the least.

Continue reading Can’t Keep My Thoughts to Myself // Emma Carpenter

A-What?-Ness // Ana Maria Vidaurri

I’ll always remember my brother telling me “ignorance of a law is not an excuse to break the law.” This seemed really strange to me, as I wondered how everyone could possibly know every law in every city in every part of the world. I’ve come to realize that what my brother said to me those many years ago is true, not just in judicial hearings, but in everyday life.

So often people choose to do what is easiest for them. They choose to drive a car because it is easier than walking home. They choose to go to McDonalds because it is easier than picking up groceries at the supermarket and cooking a meal. And more often than not, they choose to ignore underlying problems when dealing with intense issues, such as animal cruelty, sustainability, and violence. However, it is crucial for one to educate themselves on important issues in order to gain greater understanding of a situation and generate a clear opinion.  Continue reading A-What?-Ness // Ana Maria Vidaurri

Sheltered // Amy Roat

I hope my parents don’t read this.
Santa Clara University has been the place where I can go to sleep as late as I want, eat and drink whatever I want, watch all the Netflix I want, be on my phone all I want and most importantly think however I want. These are all freedoms that I did not have before when I was living at home. The freedoms that college brought were for the most part counterproductive, but I have had to learn to work efficiently. At the beginning of the year, I struggled with time management, balancing my social and academic life, but for my class, Critical Thinking and Writing, this was not the case. Continue reading Sheltered // Amy Roat

Destructive Consumption// Jean Baptiste Tooley

I grew up in the residential neighborhoods of Portland, Oregon.  I walked to the neighborhood school with my brothers every morning and came home for supper at five.  I lived the American dream.  My parents always told me how lucky I am to be in my position.  Out of all the countries, over all the years, I was somehow born into an upperclass family in the greatest empire to ever stand.  From what gathered, the United States of America was the greatest because its citizens were free.  We are free to follow dreams, I could be whoever I wanted to be.

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Who do we think we are?// Nicole Vander Helm

 

“If we were to one day encounter a form of life more powerful and intelligent than our own, and it regarded us as we regard fish, what would be our argument against being eaten?”(Foer 121)

Over the course of 20 weeks, I never would have thought a core requirement class could possibly affect my life like Critical Thinking & Writing 1 & 2 both have. My attitude towards this class was that I was going to go, participate a little bit, hand in all the assignments, and be done with it and never speak of it again. However, it was the complete opposite. I never would have thought that I would find myself re-watching videos, re-reading books that Professor Leither showed and discussed with us in class. When I first received my schedule and saw that the topic for this class was going to be food, I was very confused. How could a class that is 20 weeks long, three hours and twenty minutes twice a week, possibly be devoted to the subject of food? Over the twenty weeks, Professor Leither has shown me that food is so much more than eating three meals a day, healthy vs. unhealthy food, and the different types of food that exist. One major takeaway from this class will definitely be our many discussions about factory farming and the truth behind it.  Continue reading Who do we think we are?// Nicole Vander Helm