Tag Archives: Jonathan Safran Foer

Eating Without Question

I never was really interested in the food that I ate, especially since I wasn’t too picky and ate whatever my mom fed me. All that changed once I entered college and enrolled in a Critical Reading and Writing class.

I first thought, “Great, another English class where I learn pointless rules of how to structure my essays and reading boring essays.” However, this Critical Reading and Writing class completely surpassed my expectations. For the first quarter, we focused entirely upon the topic of “Food” reading books such as Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer. This completely changed my perspective upon food that I was putting in my body.

Image result for food cartoon

An essay I wrote, “Fever for Health” delved into the eating habits of college students. Having always heard about the so-called “obesity epidemic”, it all seemed far-fetched to me, especially seeing the lack of “obese” students. However, it was eye-opening upon learning that 95% of college students eat below the daily recommended amount of fruits and vegetables (Spain). Furthermore, although a “mere” 4.9% of college students were obese, 21.6% of them were deemed overweight (Huang). I was shocked. Although it wasn’t visible seeing this, I realized the food we consume has much more of an impact then we believe.

Image result for obesity cartoon

Not only do the food we consume affect our bodies internally and externally, there are consequences affecting beyond us. From Foer, I discovered the tragedy of the meat industry, with terrible conditions and treatment of animals that are bred solely for our consumption (Foer).

Image result for people looking at food

Now, this caused me to look internally within myself. I had always eaten food that was served for me without much thought besides, “It’s soccer season, so I should lay off of eating junk food.” Never I had given much thought like, “Where is this meat I’m eating come from and how was it produced?” Now, although I haven’t been converted to veganism or vegetarianism, I know think much critically on the food and its quality. This Critical Reading and Writing class actually turned out to truly educate me as I should’ve been previously.

 

 

Works Cited

Foer, Jonathan Safran. Eating Animals. Little, Brown & Company, 2013.

Huang, Terry T.K., et al. “Assessing Overweight, Obesity, Diet, and Physical Activity in College Students.” Taylor & Francis Online, Journal of American College Health, 24 Mar. 2010, www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07448480309595728.

Spain, Erin. “Northwestern Now.” College Kids Need to Change Unhealthy Ways, news.northwestern.edu/stories/2014/05/college-kids-need-to-change-unhealthy-ways.

 

 

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The Domino Effect // Anne Vasquez

On September 18, 2017 I attended my first classes at Santa Clara University. After an early start to my day with an 8 a.m. chemistry lecture and 11:45 a.m. calculus lecture, I felt like my day should have been over.

Nope, a 7 hour gap before my 7:20 pm Critical Thinking and Writing English class teased me. And yes, I did say 7:20 PM! I was pre-enrolled for my CTW so was automatically opposed to the class, especially because of the super late time. I remember sitting in our class the first day thinking how unusual of a time it was to be in class. Our CTW class started off as a group of students sitting in awkward silence. The silence would last for minutes and I applaud our professor, Nicholas Leither for being persistent and making us sit through that silence. Eventually our discussions started to flow more as we grew closer as a class and awkward silence was not an issue we had to worry about.

Continue reading The Domino Effect // Anne Vasquez

The Think Tank//Patrick Boos

It’s August of 2017, and I finally pull up my future schedule for the first time. Everything looks great until, no that had to be a mistake. There’s no way they’d make me go to a class that met from 7:20 to 9 p.m., right? Wow, was I wrong. Fast forward to the first day of class, and I still couldn’t believe that I was walking to class, all the way on the other side of campus, while the sun was going down. To make it all worse, the teacher seemed far too happy to be teaching a bunch of freshman at this awful time on a Wednesday night. I’m not a guy who can handle over-eager optimism, and this guy was just beaming at us from the start. Didn’t he know that I was a Biology major, a science student with absolutely no interest in taking another English class? Needless to say, my first experience concerning Nick Leither and “Food Porn” was not a great one.

Continue reading The Think Tank//Patrick Boos

(Not) Eating Animals //Emma Svensson

Imagine reading one book in college and having it change your entire lifestyle. Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer compelled me to return to my vegan lifestyle after reading but one brief chapter. I had adopted a vegan diet the summer before going to college, and while it was easy when I had a huge kitchen and a mother who would buy me vegan groceries, I knew it would be almost impossible in college. So I quit, even though I loved it. I ended up missing my almond milk lattes and grilled tempeh more than I ever thought I would.

Grilled tempeh- similar to tofu

At the start of the school year, I was excited about Santa Clara University’s dining hall and all the food it had to offer. I tend to gravitate towards healthy foods, and although my school’s dining hall is healthier than most universities’, the healthy options were still scarce and grew old fast. I quickly became tired of the same salad every night for dinner, and, frankly, the meat in our dining hall grossed me out. I was so bored with my meals that I started to eat unhealthy things that I never ate at home, like grilled cheese sandwiches.   Continue reading (Not) Eating Animals //Emma Svensson

Food for Thought // Caley Falcocchia

“There are these two young fish swimming along, and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says, “Morning, boys, how’s the water?” And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes, ‘What the hell is water?’”

-David Foster Wallace, “This is Water”

When I walked into my English Critical Thinking and Writing (CTW) class on the first day, I had no idea what to expect.  My professor, Nick Leither, showed the class David Foster Wallace’s commencement speech “This is Water.”  After discussing the speech, Professor Nick switched gears and flicked the screen over to the next slide.  The screen displayed the course overview, reading “Food Porn: Reading Food, Self, & Culture.”  Both intrigued and confused, I left class on that first day with two questions.  First off, how can an english class be entirely dedicated to food?  Also, what the hell is water?  I had no clue what was to come during the two quarters of this class.  

I should first explain that I did not sign up for this class.  Every freshman at Santa Clara University (SCU) is randomly placed into a mandatory CTW class before even arriving to campus.  I was honestly quite displeased when I learned that I had been assigned a 7:30-9:10 PM CTW class.  Convinced that my brain would not be capable of attending class at this time of the day, my naive-self even talked to my advisor to see if I could switch into a different CTW section at a different time.  As you can probably guess, my advisor told me to suck it up, and viola- my “Food Porn” CTW class at 7:30-9:10 PM was here to stay for two quarters.  Although I was first unhappy by my CTW course placement, the class and its material caused me to reflect on my lifestyle and personal values, which which will continue to stick with me- not only for the remainder of my college experience- but for the rest of my life.  

Continue reading Food for Thought // Caley Falcocchia

Wake Up and Smell the Roses (Even If There are Some Thorns)//Aria Berluti

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The summer before coming to Santa Clara University, the school had sent an email to all the freshmen asking us to fill out a questionnaire describing our interests so that they could figure out which critical thinking and writing classes to place us in. The questionnaire read: “are you interested in philosophy? Economics? Science? The environment?” And the list went on. To be honest, when filling it out, I had no idea what I was interested in, so my answers were pretty random. So when I walked into my CTW 1 class on my first day of freshman year, I didn’t know what to expect. All I knew was that the title of the course was “Food Porn,” which I had just discovered an hour before class by checking Camino. Once I arrived, there sat the professor with two books in hand: Slant (written by the professor himself) and Eating Animals, a book about vegetarianism and the meat industry. Oh great, I thought. I should’ve paid more attention to my responses on that questionnaire. Here I was, a meat-eating student from San Francisco who had been listening to the endless arguments for vegetarianism for years and still had no intention of giving up meat. Not only is this professor going to try to convert us all into vegetarians, but he’s also going to try to make us follow the same writing format so that our papers all look the same? Ugh, welcome to freshman English. Needless to say, I left that first day feeling a little salty about this class and wondering what the hell I had gotten myself into. Continue reading Wake Up and Smell the Roses (Even If There are Some Thorns)//Aria Berluti

FOR THE LOVE OF COWS: Thinking More and Caring More // Annie Styles

“If we start thinking about farm animals as sentient creatures, we may have to change the way we live.” – Tracey Stewart, Do Unto Animals (141).

Are you willing to do that?

 


Animals bring indescribable joy and meaning to my life. Everyone knows how important they are to me. I want to go to veterinary school and work with animals, because I want to dedicate part of my life to animal welfare. I love all animals, but I am partial to a few species, including cattle. I love cattle. They are beautiful, breathtaking and downright cool — they have the ability to digest cellulose. Humans cannot do that. That is cool. During my second semester of my senior year of high school, I embarked upon an independent study in which I learned about the cow’s digestive system, particularly how the microbiome of bacteria in the stomach allowed the animal to digest cellulose. The study ended with giving a presentation at my school, open to anyone, explaining the design of the ruminant stomach, the microbes living there, and how grass diets and corn diets affect the stomach. Continue reading FOR THE LOVE OF COWS: Thinking More and Caring More // Annie Styles