Tag Archives: Sustainable

Food for Thought // Caley Falcocchia

“There are these two young fish swimming along, and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says, “Morning, boys, how’s the water?” And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes, ‘What the hell is water?’”

-David Foster Wallace, “This is Water”

When I walked into my English Critical Thinking and Writing (CTW) class on the first day, I had no idea what to expect.  My professor, Nick Leither, showed the class David Foster Wallace’s commencement speech “This is Water.”  After discussing the speech, Professor Nick switched gears and flicked the screen over to the next slide.  The screen displayed the course overview, reading “Food Porn: Reading Food, Self, & Culture.”  Both intrigued and confused, I left class on that first day with two questions.  First off, how can an english class be entirely dedicated to food?  Also, what the hell is water?  I had no clue what was to come during the two quarters of this class.  

I should first explain that I did not sign up for this class.  Every freshman at Santa Clara University (SCU) is randomly placed into a mandatory CTW class before even arriving to campus.  I was honestly quite displeased when I learned that I had been assigned a 7:30-9:10 PM CTW class.  Convinced that my brain would not be capable of attending class at this time of the day, my naive-self even talked to my advisor to see if I could switch into a different CTW section at a different time.  As you can probably guess, my advisor told me to suck it up, and viola- my “Food Porn” CTW class at 7:30-9:10 PM was here to stay for two quarters.  Although I was first unhappy by my CTW course placement, the class and its material caused me to reflect on my lifestyle and personal values, which which will continue to stick with me- not only for the remainder of my college experience- but for the rest of my life.  

Continue reading Food for Thought // Caley Falcocchia

A Blind Eye // Ethan Collins

All throughout high school I enjoyed the math and science side of education. I dreaded any type of English based class. I was never much of a writer and would get looks from teachers every week like I never even attempted to edit my papers. When in reality the mechanical side of writing has always Pass-Failbeen a huge struggle for me and it has always held me back from trying to expand my writing skills. When it came time for college, I found out that I was preregistered in a critical writing class. The first thoughts that rushed through my head were all about how screwed I was. I knew college courses would be more of a challenge and if I couldn’t succeed in high school, I would inevitably fail in college. I pictured the class to be filled with boring readings about some topic that I would have no interest in along with hours of research papers. Although eventually I found out that I was horribly incorrect. Continue reading A Blind Eye // Ethan Collins

So What?// Daniela Baez

Imagine my surprise when I discovered that I was pre-enrolled in a class titled, “Food Porn.” As a nervous first-year who had never visited Santa Clara University prior to committing, I started to second guess my decision. I didn’t know SCU had such strange classes. I didn’t have any expectations because I was frankly caught very much off guard by this bold title. After the first week of class where we discussed happiness and David Foster Wallace, it didn’t seem too weird. Then came the videos about the truth behind the food industry and the realities of factory farming. Clearly, I was in for quite the journey. My relationship with food, meat in particular, was going to change whether I liked it or not. Continue reading So What?// Daniela Baez

False Perception of Reality

Authors: Robert Ota, Caley Falcocchia, Melody Nouri, Robin Johnson

        While recently attending one of the Santa Clara University’s tours, I relived my first experience of stepping foot onto the campus. I remember the beautiful surroundings striking my attention; the green grass, colorful flowers, and amazing architecture. Walking among the peach colored buildings and listening to the wonderful qualities SCU contains sparked my excitement and hopefulness to attend my soon to be college. SCU holds a strong pride for their beautiful campus shown during the recent tour I went on. Allison, my tour guide, led us around the campus with a large, welcoming smile, occasionally stopping at the more attractive and iconic parts on campus to describe certain aspects of SCU.

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Sustaining a Facade

By: Aidan Fromm, Rohan Nair, Daniel Deglane, Robert Arnold, Michael Blach

 

With only a few days left to decide on a college after senior year, Santa Clara reached out to me. I was barraged by emails asking, “Daniel, have you heard about our most recent steps towards sustainability?” “Washing machines using thirty percent less water.” “Recycled water makes up forty percent of campus-wide water use.”  “SCU Dining Services buys from local farmers.” “Designated recycle and compost bins.”  Sure, a lot of schools claim they are sustainable, but after a simple Google search, I was astounded to find that Santa Clara is actually ranked the 11th most sustainable school in the nation according Best Colleges. Santa Clara’s commitment to sustainability finally drew me in. Wanting to be at an institution that claimed to value the environment not only out of necessity, but also of a fundamental belief in social justice, I chose Santa Clara University. Continue reading Sustaining a Facade

Talking Trash

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Talking Trash
Jim, Ryan, Olivia, Ethan and Cara
Professor Leither

Every week high school students from around the country come to visit Santa Clara, and get a tour from one of the universities cheery, and bright-eyed tour guides who show the prospective students the beautiful and blooming campus, while highlighting the assets of California’s first higher education institution. Along the tour the timid high-schoolers and their parents get to see some of the main stops on campus, and usually end their visit with a meal in Benson. Santa Clara is a University that pride’s itself on its environmental practices, so when you go into places like the cafeteria you see options to throw your leftovers into not solely landfill, but compost and recycling too. So, when you have the option to throw away your trash into something other than solely the landfill, you feel good about yourself and your participation in the green movement, and contribution to a more “sustainable world.” Continue reading Talking Trash

One Size Feeds All

By Felicia Kuan, Kennedy Murphy, Rachel Napolitan, Elena Wagner-Bagues, Sened Haddad | April 25, 2017 | Updated: April 25, 2017


I am staring at my plate, and I can hear my father’s voice in my head, “we don’t waste food in this house.” My plate is still halfway full, but I am completely full. As a final attempt to not have the chicken on my plate die in vain, I ask if any of the people sitting with me would like some of my food, but they all decline as they still have food on their plates as well. I am in the dining hall in the Benson Memorial Center at Santa Clara University. I walk over to the compost bin and guiltily scrape perfectly edible food into a compost bin that’s almost overflowing with other people’s food waste. I convince myself that it is not my fault, that they serve us too much food, and the food is not being wasted, it is being composted. But I still can not help but feel bad.

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