Tag Archives: Vegan

The Think Tank//Patrick Boos

It’s August of 2017, and I finally pull up my future schedule for the first time. Everything looks great until, no that had to be a mistake. There’s no way they’d make me go to a class that met from 7:20 to 9 p.m., right? Wow, was I wrong. Fast forward to the first day of class, and I still couldn’t believe that I was walking to class, all the way on the other side of campus, while the sun was going down. To make it all worse, the teacher seemed far too happy to be teaching a bunch of freshman at this awful time on a Wednesday night. I’m not a guy who can handle over-eager optimism, and this guy was just beaming at us from the start. Didn’t he know that I was a Biology major, a science student with absolutely no interest in taking another English class? Needless to say, my first experience concerning Nick Leither and “Food Porn” was not a great one.

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(Not) Eating Animals //Emma Svensson

Imagine reading one book in college and having it change your entire lifestyle. Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer compelled me to return to my vegan lifestyle after reading but one brief chapter. I had adopted a vegan diet the summer before going to college, and while it was easy when I had a huge kitchen and a mother who would buy me vegan groceries, I knew it would be almost impossible in college. So I quit, even though I loved it. I ended up missing my almond milk lattes and grilled tempeh more than I ever thought I would.

Grilled tempeh- similar to tofu

At the start of the school year, I was excited about Santa Clara University’s dining hall and all the food it had to offer. I tend to gravitate towards healthy foods, and although my school’s dining hall is healthier than most universities’, the healthy options were still scarce and grew old fast. I quickly became tired of the same salad every night for dinner, and, frankly, the meat in our dining hall grossed me out. I was so bored with my meals that I started to eat unhealthy things that I never ate at home, like grilled cheese sandwiches.   Continue reading (Not) Eating Animals //Emma Svensson

So What?// Daniela Baez

Imagine my surprise when I discovered that I was pre-enrolled in a class titled, “Food Porn.” As a nervous first-year who had never visited Santa Clara University prior to committing, I started to second guess my decision. I didn’t know SCU had such strange classes. I didn’t have any expectations because I was frankly caught very much off guard by this bold title. After the first week of class where we discussed happiness and David Foster Wallace, it didn’t seem too weird. Then came the videos about the truth behind the food industry and the realities of factory farming. Clearly, I was in for quite the journey. My relationship with food, meat in particular, was going to change whether I liked it or not. Continue reading So What?// Daniela Baez

Forging a Sustainable Future?

Tucked away on the corner of Sherman and Benton Street, there is the strong smell of soil. Walk inside the metal gate and a small house appears to the right, with flowers crawling up the sides. You will see a wooden awning sitting to the left, shielding picnic tables from the sun. As you walk into the garden, the stone path quickly turns to dirt where rows of soil beds lay filled with flowers, peas, and other seasonal vegetables. On the far side, you can hear the ruffle of feathers coming from an enclosure home to six chickens. One or two volunteers are bent over, sweeping the path or clipping stems, oblivious to the construction noises of the new law school a block away, or the cars driving by on the street. They are zoned in on the task at hand, in touch with the serenity that the Forge Garden provides. Once you enter the garden, all classes and obligations that were stacking up in your mind fade away. How have you gone so long without knowing about this small green space, so tranquil and so close to campus?

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A Routine of Blindness // Jack Chapman

Over the course of six months, I never expected my perspective could change so drastically. After reading many influential texts, watching many depictive films, and having a number of important conversations with my colleagues, I’ve come to a realization;

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The Beef with Beef

IMG_3906 (Medium)Authors: Sean Driscoll, Daniel Alling, Christina Kraus, Katherine Wickstrom, Annie Martin, Connor Lucier

So much information is constantly being thrown at you. Most of the time you retain something that strikes you or something that you perceive as being important. Throw in complex discussions and you have your mind on high-speed. College is often the place where young adults are posed difficult and vague questions, which they fathom over. Finding themselves in a new and informative environment, college students are introduced to a wide variety of opportunities to pursue and experiment with. Pursuing these opportunities usually allows students to further develop their young minds and discover their true identities. This is a critical step for humans on the path to innovation, advancement, and evolution of knowledge and culture. Continue reading The Beef with Beef

Saving the Humans: Are You an Accomplice to Murder, Cruelty, and Some Really Bad Decision Making?

March 2015 014 ADJ (Large)
The Santa Clara University Authors: Jason Capili, Miranda Caputo, Brian Cox, Keerthana Duddi, Tyler Gambill, Mark Hattori, Katherine Heiler, Kyle Mcmorrow, Justin Meeken, Peter Mitchell, Yuya Oguchi, Reydavid Palomares, Michael Pierotti, Brandon Smith, Sarek Sotelojimenez, Noah Strong

Almost every time Americans turn on the news, watch a movie, or read the newspaper, they witness some form of violence–often glorified. The news constantly focuses on incidents featuring cruelty and brutality and places more emphasis on reporting news involving violence because, while triggering the gag reflex of most Americans, it draws their attention to the subject at hand (Paskova). Violence is like an accident on the side of a freeway: no matter how horrible it is, people cannot help but observe it–they enjoy watching it. Because violence is eye-catching, the news covers violent events like murders and war to pull in more viewers (Paskova). Americans see violence, such as offshore conflicts, on the news so often that they lose the sense of impact that it once carried; they become desensitized.  That word, “desensitized,” is common when talking about violence.  But what isn’t so common is how that desensitization might affect our daily lives, our perspectives, or even our choices.  Would it sound crazy if we suggested to you that watching violent film and television influences the way you choose your meat in a supermarket? Continue reading Saving the Humans: Are You an Accomplice to Murder, Cruelty, and Some Really Bad Decision Making?